The key to progress is often what we as musicians do between lessons, not what we do during lessons. Musicians often assume the more time they spend practicing, the better they will become. While we know that practice is needed to progress, how we go about this practice is key to how quickly the progress is made.

Quick mute changes can very quickly turn a perfectly good brass player into a solo percussionist in the middle of a performance. Has this happened to you? Test-pieces for wind and brass bands often have a situation where whole brass section is muted and indeed many brass players are increasingly called upon to change mutes quickly. Use these tips to prevent your next mute change from becoming a percussion solo!

Meet Denis Wick euphonium artist, Tim Maeseneer. Tim is Professor of Saxhorn (Band instruments) at the prestigious Leuven University College of Arts (LUCA) campus Lemmensinstituut. He is soloist in residence with Brassband Willebroek and an ambassador and performing artist for Denis Wick Products and Besson Musical Instruments.  Learn about how it all started, and what is currently happening in his career in this series of Get to Know interviews.

Anything can be achieved on our instrument, so long as we practice incrementally. I’ve always called this style of practice “incremental,” because it describes how we improve our skills by one unit at a time in an organized linear way. And it’s exactly the mindset you should proceed with when trying to play lower.

Straight mutes come in all sizes and materials, and understanding how they can work for you will make your life a lot easier. Tom Hutchinson, principal cornetist of the Cory Brass Band, play-tests 3 of our straight mute options: the aluminium straight, copper bottom, and pianissimo mute. Which one will work best for you next muted section?

Euphonium soloist, conductor and educator John Caputo is the Lecturer of Euphonium and Trombone at the University of Texas at San Antonio. A sixteen-year veteran of the US Air Force Bands Program, he has built an international reputation for excellence as a performer and educator. Find out out about Johns career, teaching, what product John plays, and how he chooses it in this Denis Wick Get to Know clinic with Alliance mouthpiece performer, John Caputo.

Meet Denis Wick euphonium artist, Algirdas Matonis. Algirdas Matonis is a Lithuanian born euphonium player. He currently serves as a Principal Euphonium at the River City Brass Band in Pittsburgh and is traveling internationally as a soloist, chamber musician and a clinician. Learn about how it all started, and what is currently happening in his career in this series of Get to Know interviews.

Meet Dopey Monkey, Denis Wick's first artist group duo. Tuba player Danielle Price, and Euphonium player have been performing together since 2015. Their original compositions are an amazing fusion of jazz, folk, classical and experimental music. Get to know Martin and Danielle in this recent interview with Denis Wick Artist manager, Brett Baker.

When you need a new mouthpiece, you might consider many different measurements and specification to determine a unique fit to your needs. Do we need to take the same measures for a cup mute? Of course not, but there are some key things to consider before you choose what cup mute to purchase.